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Current

Physics research groups of FU Berlin contribute to various CRCs.

SFB 1449

SFB 1449

The overarching aim of this CRC is to understand the individual and combined contributions of the physicochemical key parameters to hydrogel (dys)function in health and disease.

Our key objective is the molecular definition of mucus (structure, properties and dynamics at the molecular level). Our chemical, physical, medical and modelling expertise will be applied to specific key questions: What is the role of the individual hydrogel components, i.e., mucins, proteins, salt and water, in the complex process of their network formation and function?

Spokesperson

Prof. Dr Rainer Haag, Department of Biology, Chemistry, Pharmacy

Involved groups

Research Group Netz

Project Group Alexiev

CRC 1449

SFB 1349

SFB 1349

The researchers want to understand and control the complex interactions that can arise from fluorinated building blocks in chemical systems. They want to discover how such interactions affect a wide range of physicochemical properties and chemical reactivities. These include the effects of fluorine-specific interactions on the properties of functional materials, their influence on various catalytic processes and the biochemical and pharmacological effects on a range of biological systems.

Funding

€ 9.1 m

Spokesperson

Prof. Dr Sebastian Hasenstab-Riedel, Freie Universität Berlin

Involved groups

Research Group Netz

Research Group Heberle

Involved universities

  • Freie Universität Berlin
  • Humboldt University Berlin
  • Technical University Berlin
  • BAM - Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung
  • University of Bayreuth
  • University of Stuttgart

SFB 1349

SFB 1319

SFB 1319

This CRC focuses on the investigation of a microscopic quantum mechanical understanding of individual chiral molecules in the gas phase under perfectly defined experimental conditions. It employs the most advanced tools of experimental and theoretical gas phase atoms, molecular, and optical/quantum optical (AMO) physics for control and manipulation of chirality on the single-molecule level. With the help of extreme light, covering all relevant excitation regimes in terms of energy, intensity, and temporal resolution, it addresses the full chiral quantum system of electrons and nuclei in each individual molecule.

Coordinating university

University of Kassel

Involved group

Research Group Koch

CRC 1319

SFB 1114 - Skalenkaskaden in komplexen Systemen

SFB 1114 - Skalenkaskaden in komplexen Systemen

Modeling and simulation techniques for various predictions

The scientists from meteorology, geology, biochemistry, mathematics and physics develop modeling techniques that enable a controlled distribution of computational degrees of freedom across the scale cascade. They elaborate simulation techniques for the prediction of e.g. earthquakes or large amounts of precipitation.

Spokesperson

Prof. Rupert Klein, Freie Universität Berlin

Involved groups

Research Group Eisert

Research Group Heyne

Research Group Netz

CRC 1114

How does a distinct set of molecular switches control the spatio-temporal regulation of a diverse range of biological processes?

Biological signals are generated by molecular switches. These allow temporal and spatial coordination of a wide range of cellular processes. The overarching goal of our research consortium is to functionally analyze how a distinct set of molecular switches controls the spatio-temporal regulation of a diverse range of biological processes.

Intriguingly, in many cases, the molecular events that are downstream of the activation of a molecular switch trigger a cellular switch such as cell fate decisions between survival and apoptosis. To investigate the molecular mechanisms that link molecular switches to cellular switches in living cells, we use advanced chemical biology tools such as photoactivatable membrane lipids.

Coordinating university

University of Heidelberg

Vice-coordination

Freie Universität

Involved research group

Research Group Clementi

CRC/TRR 186

SFB 951

SFB 951

How can we combine significantly different classes of materials in hybrid inorganic/organic systems (HIOS) so that we realize substantially improved and potentially novel optoelectronic functionalities?

In the first phase, scientists investigated and comprehensively understood the fundamental chemical, electronic and photonic interactions in inorganic/organic hybrid systems. They discovered novel hybridized quantum states and coupled excitations at HIOS interfaces. Besides, the fundamental limit of the modern inorganic bulk semiconductors used so far was identified.

Currently, researchers are working to exploit the extremely high surface-to-volume ratio and strong light-matter interaction of atomically thin monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides. They aim to determine the fundamental interactions and optoelectronic properties of these heterostructures to achieve maximum coupling and functionality.

Coordinating university

Humboldt University Berlin

Involved groups

Research Group Bolotin

Research Group Franke

CRC 951

The research center focuses on how to control dissipative structures in nonlinear dynamical systems far from thermodynamic equilibrium. An interdisciplinary team of applied mathematicians, theoretical physicists, and computational neuroscientists goes beyond merely describing the intriguing dynamics of self-organizing nonlinear systems. They aim to develop novel theoretical approaches and methods of control, and to demonstrate how to apply these concepts to a selection of innovative self-organizing systems ranging from condensed hard and soft matter to biological systems.

Coordinating university

Technical University Berlin

Involved groups

Research Group von Oppen

Research Group Metelmann

CRC 910

For physicists affected by the war in Ukraine